Friday, July 28, 2017

2017 HCH Officers and Committee Members


Tom Ames, Guildmaster and Exectutive Committee Chair

Tom-Ames

Tom Ames is a native of Chester Co., Pennsylvania. From both his maternal and paternal sides, his American ancestry pre-dates the French and Indian war. His introduction to American history came by way of family elders who enthralled him with stories of family heritage and the traditions of his patriot ancestry from Pennsylvania and Massachusetts who served the cause for Liberty. His ancestral log and stone homestead on his maternal side still stands in the shadow of Mount Misery at Valley Forge.

His introduction to horn began in 1955-56 when he became infatuated with powder horns and longrifles through the Disney production, “Davy Crockett.” He purchased his first antique powder horn at age 11 by saving quarters and dimes for the required sum of three-dollars, it would take another 10 years before acquiring his first flintlock, “Kentucky” rifle—just to go along with his collection of horns. Horns come first in Tom’s mind and heart.

Known to many through his long association with the Gunmakers Fair at Dixons, his mentorship and dedication to our heritage in horn, helped lay the groundwork for the present revival of the craft. Besides an interest in horn, Tom is an avid student of American folk art and folkway cultures.

If asked to submit a résumé he would shrug his shoulders and state that he received his basic education with 16 other students in a rural one-room school, went on to study history at high school (when huntin’ and fishin’ weren’t in season) then on to the Bamboo-League at the University of Saigon. His post graduate studies consisted of collecting powder horns, fly fishing for mountain brook trout and birding for grouse and woodcock with muzzle-loading and classic double hammer guns. In the interim, raising three fine daughters was the easiest and least expensive of the subjects. Tom retired in 2010 from the pharmaceutical industry as an HVAC technician.

Organizational roles: Board of Directors KRA (6-years); All State Post Cmdr., VFW (3-yrs); Co-founder/V. Pres., Grouse Hall-Vintagers OEG; Program coordinator, Gunmakers Fair at Dixons (29-years); NRA-Life. Tom currently maintains an active leadership role in Veteran’s affairs in the state of Pennsylvania.

Tom reflects that besides family, the most influential people in his life have been Madison Grant, the Dixon family and the many fine associates with whom he can share his appreciation of horn. He maintains, “Horn is merely the catalyst to our relationships with people—both past and present.”

Thos. E.Ames
221 E. Reeceville Rd
Downingtown, PA 19335

tamesfox2@gmail.com


Dick Toone, Past Guildmaster

Dick-Toone.pngMy name is Richard “Dick” Toone. I live with my wife of 46 years, Regina, within five miles of the Mt. Holly, New Jersey hospital where I was born. I have two wonderful married sons with one grandson. I have been a member of the NMLRA since 1976, former N-SSA member, present CLA, ALRA and member of the Horn Guild.

I am a four year US Navy veteran dirigible crew member, Rutgers Business major alumni, former IBM employe, then sales executive for Johnson and Towers, Inc., a marine Detroit Diesel engine distributor.

I built my first muzzle-loader in 1976 after retiring from more than a decade of racing stock outboard runabout and hydroplanes, and then returned to my first love of history by building a J.P. Beck from photos using a Sharon .50 cal barrel and began to source information on the Longhunter period. This led to a small gathering of like minded friends and four season camping with a single blanket. We attended an NMLRA Eastern in 1982 and when I told my wife of “seeing the elephant” she wanted to go and take the kids.

We started making camp furniture for the rendezvous scene in the 1980′s and segued into authentic reproduction camp equipage from original examples as a business in 1990. Now full-time filling orders for a variety of National and State Historical sites, as well as the living history community.
(My picture shows me with my first powder horn (1950) and latest gun (2010) both hand wrought by me.)
Richard S. Toone
18 Tower Drive
Columbus, NJ 08022
e-mail: RnRToone@gmail.com
phone: 609-261-3415

Website: www.livinghistoryshop.com



Carl Dumke – Guildmaster Elect

Carl Dumke Master HornerMy name is Carl “Indy” Dumke and I was born at Scott Air Force Base in Belleville, Illinois. After tagging along with my parents all over the world at a very young age, we settled in Ohio where i live in Washington Township. I, like many of my ancestors since the French and Indian War, joined the military where I just recently retired after 26 years of flying, 12 assignments, countless overseas deployments, and three combat tours.
I spent a number of years studying art across the globe, especially in European medieval cities and museums. In 2006, I began to focus on early American folk art and specialize in recreating 18th and early 19th century signage, woodworking, and chaulkware.
I joined the Honorable Company of Horners in 2008. I am currently honored to be a Master in good standing and a current member of the American & Contemporary Longrifle Associations. This is my first appointment with the guild and I pledge is to raise the standards and traditions of the guild to a higher standard through my service devotion.
Email: cjdumke86@yahoo.com

Art DeCamp, Treasurer

ArtCarlisleBook-2I became Treasurer of the HCH in March of 2007, and have served in that capacity since. Prior to being treasurer I served on the awards, judging and education committees. I was born in 1950 and grew up in West Lafayette, Indiana. I have had a lifelong interest Kentucky rifles and powder horns and built my first horn in 1980.

My specialties include accurate recreations of screw-tip and Tansel style engraved horns. My powder horns have won first place ribbons on several occasions at Dixon’s Gun Makers Fair and at the Honourable Company of Horners annual competition with “Best Pennsylvania Style Horn” and “Best of Show.” The National Rifle Association has on three occasions awarded special engraved horns of my creation to their outgoing Presidents. My work has been featured in Muzzle Blasts, Muzzleloader, Westylvania, and Common Ground magazines, and has been exhibited at the Western Pennsylvania Museum of History in Pittsburgh, PA.

I am honored to be a “Master” member of the Honourable Company of Horners. I am a member of the Kentucky Rifle Association, the NMLRA and a charter member of the Contemporary Longrifle Association. I am also a life member of the NRA.

Recently, I have been honored with the publication of “Pennsylvania “Horns of the Trade, Screw-tip Powder Horns and Their Architecture” by The Kentucky Rifle Foundation.

Art DeCamp
2210 Acorn Circle
Huntingdon, PA 16652
(h) 814-643-6343
(cell) 814-386-1880
ajdecamp@verizon.net

Website: www.artspowderhorns.com


John DeWald, Secretary

JohnDeWald

John is a native of Northeastern Pennsylvania and grew up on the other side of the Muncy Creek, outside of the historical town of Muncy, PA.  He started shooting black powder 40 years ago with his father.  He inspired John, at age 12, to start making simple powder horns and doing scrimshaw .  John continued to pursue his love of art until leaving PA to serve his country in the Army.  Upon returning home, he found work as a correctional officer and eventually moved from state to federal service, where he is still employed.  In 1998, John met and eventually married the girl next door.  They have been married for 15 years. They live on 11 acres with their daughter, in a historical house built in 1863.  Their home is located outside a little village called Pennsdale.

In 2004, John began participating in French and Indian War re-enactments.  This renewed his interest in making powder horns.  While researching for information to construct a horn in 2009, he stumbled across information for the “Honourable Company of Horners,” a guild dedicated to the preservation and continuing education of horn work.  John joined the guild in 2011 and attended his first conference that same year, winning a ribbon for the horn he created for his friend.  In March of 2016, John obtained the rank of Master Horner.

John has become completely consumed by this ancient craft.  He spends countless hours doing research and tinkering away in his 1863 basement workshop.  His work is both contemporary and historical.  This includes; powder horns, spice boxes, wing-bone turkey calls and other fine accouterments from horn, bone, and wood.  During his personal time, John enjoys hunting, fishing, reading, writing, drawing and attending various 18th century events with his family and friends.

John States: “When I make these items, I keep in mind they are more than just items of purpose.  They will become heirlooms and more, outlasting us all.  They will be a testament to the heart and soul of the maker and the craftsmen of old.   Awards and events may come and go, but they will never match the warmth and satisfaction gained from the friends I have made through this craft and the Guild.  Years from now, when I am gone and my ashes have returned to Mother Earth, it is my hope someone will pick up an item I have made, show it to their son, daughter, or friend, and say, “Hey that’s a DeWald piece.” It is the preservation of a dying art, kept alive through caring hands.  What a great legacy that will be to leave behind for my daughter”.

John L. DeWald Jr., Master Horner and Scrimshander
157 Middle Road, #1
Hollinglea Acres
Pennsdale, PA 17756

Phone: 570-220-6450
Email: PA_horner@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.pahorner.com


Roland Cadle, Consultant to the Executive Committee and Education Committee Chair

Roland-Cadle.pngFounded the HCH in 1996
Master Horner
Guildmaster 1997-1999
Guildmaster 2002-2003

Roland’s journey into horn work took a path few could imagine, but are glad that he did, as his experiences culminated in the formation of the Honourable Company of Horners.  For that, all members of the Guild are profoundly grateful for his determination, dedication and foresight.

He built his first campaign horn at age twelve.  The school janitor, and neighbor to his best friend, taught him how to build and engrave a horn as a professional would have done.  The seed was planted.

Seven years later, he found the lost S.W. Johnson powder horn, and although the owner would not sell it, he did loan it to  Roland.  That following year, he mail ordered a horn from Texas, and copied the S.W. Johnson horn, which is a NY map horn on the outboard side and the map of Cuba on the inboard.  He sold that first copy for $15 with which he purchased a Christmas gift for Kathy, his wife of four months.

In 1971, as a pastor in Hagerstown, MD, Roland became acquainted with the Eagle Mountain Long Rifles and in particular, with Jack Cline.  Jack, who was a period blade smith and rifle maker, also had a wonderful collection of screw tip horns.  Questions arose as to their history, who made them, and how were they made?  He always thought of powder horns as being made individually, but now seeing screw tips, realized these horns were shop-made.

In 1972, Roland attended the Baltimore Gun Show.  There were two display tables of original horn ware that caught his attention:  boxes, bottles, ink horns, shoe horns, lanthorns, scythe horns, powder horns and combs-especially a folding comb fashioned as an Indian Princess.  Roland, now 22 was mesmerized, for here was something totally foreign to him.  These scores of professionally made items made Roland wonder as to whether or not horn work was an actual trade and the number of other existing horn items?  If so, there should be a history, and an English or European guild.

“If I have developed an eye for what is original and have correctly calculated the methodology, I have to attribute the talent to the opportunities to view private collections, which included this variety of horn ware items.  Sometimes the ‘homely, uncelebrated’ pieces were most telling, and to me, most valuable.”

Roland felt that if such a trade existed, he would document it through surviving artifacts, original written material and by recreating the shop, tools, and methods.  He then would reproduce as many of those original items as possible.

Twenty years later, Roland was confident in the horn work knowledge he had gained and felt ready to advance to a higher level.  He and Kathy mortgaged their house to finance a horn faire at the Mercer Museum in Bucks County, PA!  They borrowed $4,000 and the rest is history.

Roland sums it up best:  “The friendships that support, and the craftsmanship that causes you to strive harder, have been the blessings received.”

Owner of Village Restorations and Consulting, Inc.
Email: info@villagerestorations.com


John DeWald, Membership Committee Chair

JohnDeWald

John is a native of Northeastern Pennsylvania and grew up on the other side of the Muncy Creek, outside of the historical town of Muncy, PA.  He started shooting black powder 40 years ago with his father.  He inspired John, at age 12, to start making simple powder horns and doing scrimshaw .  John continued to pursue his love of art until leaving PA to serve his country in the Army.  Upon returning home, he found work as a correctional officer and eventually moved from state to federal service, where he is still employed.  In 1998, John met and eventually married the girl next door.  They have been married for 15 years. They live on 11 acres with their daughter, in a historical house built in 1863.  Their home is located outside a little village called Pennsdale.

In 2004, John began participating in French and Indian War re-enactments.  This renewed his interest in making powder horns.  While researching for information to construct a horn in 2009, he stumbled across information for the “Honourable Company of Horners,” a guild dedicated to the preservation and continuing education of horn work.  John joined the guild in 2011 and attended his first conference that same year, winning a ribbon for the horn he created for his friend.  In March of 2016, John obtained the rank of Master Horner.

John has become completely consumed by this ancient craft.  He spends countless hours doing research and tinkering away in his 1863 basement workshop.  His work is both contemporary and historical.  This includes; powder horns, spice boxes, wing-bone turkey calls and other fine accouterments from horn, bone, and wood.  During his personal time, John enjoys hunting, fishing, reading, writing, drawing and attending various 18th century events with his family and friends.

John States: “When I make these items, I keep in mind they are more than just items of purpose.  They will become heirlooms and more, outlasting us all.  They will be a testament to the heart and soul of the maker and the craftsmen of old.   Awards and events may come and go, but they will never match the warmth and satisfaction gained from the friends I have made through this craft and the Guild.  Years from now, when I am gone and my ashes have returned to Mother Earth, it is my hope someone will pick up an item I have made, show it to their son, daughter, or friend, and say, “Hey that’s a DeWald piece.” It is the preservation of a dying art, kept alive through caring hands.  What a great legacy that will be to leave behind for my daughter”.

John L. DeWald Jr., Master Horner and Scrimshander
157 Middle Road, #1
Hollinglea Acres
Pennsdale, PA 17756

Phone: 570-220-6450
Email: PA_horner@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.pahorner.com


Kris Polizzi, Fundraising Committee Chair

Krista-PMy name is Kris Polizzi and my husband, Jerry and I live in Lancaster County, Pa. We met while both working at a local gun shop so we share an interest in hunting, fishing and shooting. I also love to garden, especially growing heirloom varieties. A few years into our marriage we discovered a common dream to participate in a reenacting or living history group. We joined a local Civil War unit and the fun began! Our interest soon spread to earlier time periods as well and we began further study of the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 2008 I made my first powder horn as a surprise birthday present for my husband. Although I deemed it “not quite a success,” the time was well spent. My interest grew and I soon met some HCH members who were extremely helpful and full of advice for my “next horn”. My next horn took a few years, thanks to our four boys, for whom I gladly give up most of my spare time. I have enjoyed may horn projects in the last few years and look forward to learning more!

Muzzleloaders, horn and leatherwork, blacksmithing and weaving have all become a big part of our family. We love to see the desire in our boy’s, to join in with us! We have also met so many good friends though living histories, reenactments and shows- we are truly blessed!

I would like to thank the many members of the HCH who have extended us such a warm welcome into the hobby. They are always so willing to share their knowledge and experience with others. They are truly a credit to the group!

Kris Polizzi

 


Rick Sheets, Publications Committee Chair and Webmaster

RickSheets.pngMy name is Rick Sheets and I grew up Southern California, spending much of my childhood drawing, painting and sculpting. Early on I had an affinity for history and old guns as well as art. I have been involved in shooting black powder since the age of 14.

As a freelance graphic artist and web designer, I found myself rebuilding the Honourable Company of Horners website a several years ago and became enamored with their art. Since that time, I have had the privilege of working with some of the best 18th Century style artisans in the word! And at last, I found an artistic endeavor that combines history, cartography, calligraphy, engraving (scrimshaw) and illuminated script all in one object!

I enjoy building historic style horn items and presenting horn work to school age kids and the general public at historic venues.

In addition to being a proud member of the HCH, I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Lafayette Long Rifles muzzleloading club, the Contemporary Longrifle Association, the National Muzzleloading Rifle Association and a NRA Life Member.

Rick Sheets, Journeyman Horner
919-321-8349
curator@hornguild.org

www.patriothorns.com

Ed Long – Events – Summer Reception

Ed Long GuildmasterI was born and raised in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and reside there to this day. I am married, and have two children, three grandchildren and two great grandchildren. I served in the U.S. Army for eight years, three years of active duty, and five years active duty reserves. In 1996, I retired as a Sergeant from the Pennsylvania State Police force after serving 31 years.
I am an avid hunter who took an interest in black powder in the early 1970’s, which has been a part of my life ever since. Early on I made a few powder horns for myself and friends but due to job restraints, let my interest sit by the wayside. Several years after retirement, my fire for horn work was re-lit and I have been working on horns nonstop since 2001. To date, I have made close to 650 powder horns and other horn items. I have been a member of the Honourable Company of Horners since 2002 and in 2009 advanced from Freeman to Journeyman.

In March 2010 I was elected Guildmaster of the Honourable Company of Horners and my term expired in 2012.
I am available to help the current Guildmaster Jeff Bibb to enable a smooth transition.
I am also a member of the Contemporary Longrifle Association, the National Muzzleloading Rifle Association, Benefactor Life National Rifle Association, and Senior Life Safari Club International.

Ed Long
4048 Hecktown Road
Bethlehem, PA 18020
(cell) 610-554-3930


Clinton E. Byers – Awards and Advancement Committee Chair

Clinton_Byers

Clint Byers lives near Boone, North Carolina with his wife, Kerry, and their two young children. The son of a flintlock rifle builder, Clint grew up immersed in longrifle culture. Accouterment making was just a natural part of that upbringing and Clint began making powder horns in 1984. Through the years Clint’s interests took many directions: from classic motorcycles, to primitive archery, to aboriginal skills, to blacksmithing, but always there has been the love of eighteenth century history and the thrill of being in the woods with a flintlock.

For Christmas 2008, Clint’s father gave him a copy of Jim Dresslar’s The Engraved Powder Horn: Folk Art of Early America. Inspired by the full color pictures of those original horns, Clint began working hard to make powder horns that were authentic in both form and function. While doing research, he stumbled across the HCH web site and in 2010 became a dues paying member. Under the tutelage of many in the Guild, Clint has blossomed as a horn worker expanding his skills well beyond powder horns. Today he is a Journeyman level horner in the Guild.

Clint’s passion for muzzle loading and longrifle culture is as strong today as it was in his childhood. Clint shoots regularly and hunts each fall with his flintlock. He and his family are regular interpreters and demonstrators at many local historic sites and events. Besides being a member of the HCH, Clint is also a current member of the Contemporary Longrifle Association, the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association, and the Overmountain Victory Trail Association.

Clinton E. Byers
828-754-7587

Email: hornandfiber@gmail.com
Website: www.hornandfiber.com

 

Merchandising Committee Chair – John Kiselica

Horn Book Editors- Bill Carter and Bob Albrecht